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Esperanza Spalding – I Know You Know

The way you look at me when you think I’m not looking, tells me…. 
Your heart’s, a sleeping giant worn out by someone you loved before me. 
I see you’re scared unconvinced by what I’ve tried to say; 
That I am yours and that nothing will take me away. 

I know that you know but I’ll sing it again; 
I love you babe and nothing will take me away

The way you always call me with some question and every time
Try to pretend you didn’t call me just ‘cause I was on your mind. 
Too soon for you to say out loud but I know. 
You love me and though we don’t say it already shows. 

I know that you know but I’ll sing it again; 
I love you babe and nothing will take me away. 
You already know but I’ll sing it again; 
I love you babe and nothing will take me away.

I wait for you to open up. But, it’s not a bore. 
You’re just what I’ve been looking for. 
Why do you keep your head in the sand? 
Whoever you loved before me that ran’s 
Nothing like me… 
Nothing like me… 
Nothing like me… 

I know that you know but I’ll sing it again; 
I love you babe and nothing will take me away. 
You already know but I’ll sing it again; 
I love you babe and nothing will take me away.

The way you look at me when you think I’m not looking. 
The way you call me up just to see what’s cooking. 
The way you look at me when you think I’m not looking. 
I look at you that way too you just don’t know that I do. 

I know that you know. You already know

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A Reggae Interpretation of Kind Of Blue

kirvysplash:

In the spring of 1981 a group of reggae studio musicians from Jamaica gathered in New York City under the direction of Jeremy Taylor, a music professor at NYU at that time. The result was this Reggae Interpretation of Kind of Blue.

Though he was primarily regarded as a world-class Jazz musician and educator, Taylor had taken several trips to Jamaica to study reggae music with some of the best performers in the world. In his 1979 book, A Space Between Taylor wrote, My first trip to Jamaica (May 1977) was the most eye-opening musical experience of my life. I met so many incredible players who had been brushed off by the snobby musical establishment at institutions such as the ones I was affiliated with. They showed more musicality, taste, and rhythmic comprehension than some of the most revered musicians in the states. I knew that I had to find a way to showcase their unparalleled talent in a different medium in order for some of my colleagues to fully understand and learn from it. This statement served as the basic concept behind this album. Taylor took the most loved, well-known modern jazz album of all time and put it in the hands of reggae musicians. It was in this context that he felt his contemporaries would be able to fully understand what it was he saw in these players.

Unfortunately, weeks after directing the sessions Taylor passed away in his Paris hotel room while on a speaking tour of Europe. A final mix of the album was never made and it was never released. Collectors have long spoken of this album and in the late 80s lo-fi cassette tapes of rough mixes circulated. No official release was ever issued until now.

In early 2009, Secret Stash Records began working with the Taylor estate to finally release this album. After creating final mixes, dub versions of all the songs were also made by Secret Stash producers. Now for the first time ever, this highly sought-after album is available. This vinyl-only release is a must have for any record collector.

TRACK LIST:

SIDE A
01. So What
02. Freddie Freeloader
03. Blue In Green
04. All Blues
05. Flamenco Sketches

SIDE A
01. So What (Dub)
02. Freddie Freeloader (Dub)
03. Blue In Green (Dub)
04. All Blues (Dub)
05. Flamenco Sketches (Dub)

secretstashrecords

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Pikasso

Four necks. Two sound holes. 42 strings. Two access doors; one on the upper player’s side and one at the tail block. Created by luthier Linda Manzer for guitarist Pat Metheny, the instrument took 2 years to build (approximately 1000 hours), and when the 42 strings are strung up to high tension, the Pikasso is under approximately 1000 lbs pressure. It weighs 6.7 kg or 14 ¾ lbs.

Pikasso, multi-necked guitar by luthier Linda Manzer

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500 Days of Summer – The Smiths – Please, Please, Please, Let Me Get What I Want

Good times for a change 
See, the luck I’ve had 
Can make a good man 
Turn bad 

So please please please 
Let me, let me, let me 
Let me get what I want 
This time 

Haven’t had a dream in a long time
See, the life I’ve had 
Can make a good man turn bad 

So for once in my life 
Let me get what I want 
Lord knows, it would be the first time 
Lord knows, it would be the first time